Paul Roub

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Just Released: ‘Full of Holes’

I’ve been visiting my friend Mark for a few days, and we’ve been making music.

This music. Please check it out; I’m really proud of this one. First time in forever I’ve done a “band” recording… “band” in quotes since it’s mostly me, but with Mark (thankfully) taking over the drums.

IE View Updated, Still Exists

Remember IE View? Little Firefox extension, lets you quickly open the the current page or link in IE, see how it looks on the wrong side of the tracks?

It’s still here, I’ve just forgotten to tell you about the last few updates. We’re at 1.5.1 now.

Nothing major has changed - mostly fixes to work in the latest Firefox pre-releases, as well as fixes to some minor bugs. If you’d disabled IE View because it didn’t work in far-flung pre-alpha releases, you should feel free to reinstall.

Grab the latest from addons-mozilla.org; your feedback is always appreciated - see the home page for details.

Note to Self: Run Right Now.

Just got in from a nice run on a beautiful night. Not too long, not too fast. An easy weekday run. Almost punted and gave in to “I’m tired, there’s laundry, I’ll run in the morning.” I’m glad I didn’t, and I’d like to remind my stupid self why, for next time.

You’ll be tired in the morning, too. Tired and sleepy.

There’s always laundry.

You’re often more tired after running. At night, that’s a good thing; less so in the morning.

You like running, remember? You pay money and drive places to pin a number on your shirt and get excited and take pictures of starting lines.

walking to the starting line

The rice and beans and veggies and curry powder you put in the pot before you left smell amazing. All post-running food is the best food. Remember the bananas after the last race? Yes, you do.

If you’re reading this in the summer, remember that you get to jump in the pool afterwards. I suggest bringing a mango (see above re: food).

“Tired legs from running” is a much better feeling than “stiff neck from falling asleep on the couch.”

When else do you get to listen to music with no other distractions? How great is the new Craig Finn? (correct answer: pretty great)

That feeling after the first mile.

That feeling after the second mile.

That feeling with one mile to go.

That feeling right now.

In Summary: Shoes on, out the door, now.

How to Exclude Replies From the Twitter Profile Widget

Should you (for some reason) visit the root page of roub.net, you’ll see a collection of posts from this blog, my work blog, Flickr photos, and other things, all collected by an aggregator named Planet Venus.

To keep the noise level down just a bit, I decided to keep my twitter activity out of that list, and use Twitter’s Profile Widget instead. It’s in the sidebar on that page.

That was still noisier than I wanted, though. I didn’t need my @replies to others showing up there, but the configuration options didn’t offer a “don’t include replies” choice. A bit of Googling led me to this page, which noted the code needed to add a filter, without explicitly showing where. Reading the widget code cleared that up, but it may be less than obvious if you don’t spend your days wrangling JSON.

The widget code that Twitter provides you with includes a block that starts with:

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new TWTR.Widget({
  version: 2,
  ...

Look for the section below that which looks something like:

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features: {
  scrollbar: false,
  loop: false,
  live: true,
  behavior: 'all'
}

The exact contents will vary. Leave them as is, and add, right after the features: line, the following:

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filters: {
  negatives: /^@\w{1,20}\s/
},

The indentation doesn’t matter, but copy it verbatim otherwise. In the example above, we end up with:

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features: {
  filters: {
    negatives: /^@\w{1,20}\s/
  },
  scrollbar: false,
  loop: false,
  live: true,
  behavior: 'all'
}

We’re telling the widget to remove any lines that start with a @ followed by 1-20 “word” characters. That is, anything starting with someone’s Twitter handle – a reply.

That’s it. Feel free to view the source at roub.net to see it in place.

Straps and Buttons

I recently lucked into a Takamine G-335 12-string in a well-timed eBay bid.  I’m very happy with it, but sitting down? On stage? This will not do. But there’s just the one strap button at the butt end, and I’m not tying a strap to the headstock; that maybe looked cool on Elvis. Maybe.

I’d been meaning to put strap locks on my Strat, which would leave me with a spare strap button or two.

So:

And then…

Safety first…

Et voilĂ .

It is at this point that I realize I don’t yet have a strap for this guitar.

So close…

Tools of the Trade, iPad Edition

If more than two people ask me about something I’m using, especially if it’s more than two people at one show, it seems worth the time to write it down.

Paul and Brian

It may look like my friend Brian is paying close attention, awaiting the moment when he’ll add some more harmonies. Actually, he’s looking past me, at my iPad, attached to a nearby stand.

Paul, Brian, iPad

It’s held there by an IK Multimedia iKlip mic stand mount. There are a number of products that do this job; this is the one I happen to own, and it does its one job very well.

So why is it there? I know folks who run GarageBand onstage this way, but in my case, it’s just lyric sheets and/or setlists. So when I need a memory jog on a new song, the occasional cover or (as sadly happened last night) when I blank on an older song of mine, it’s right there.

There’s any number of ways to get those lyrics on there, but like any good nerd, I lean toward plain text files. Something I can edit on any machine I own, view on my phone if need be, etc.

The app used for viewing the songs is GoodReader. I like that it will read almost anything I throw at it, but especially like the way it syncs with Dropbox. I have a “Lyrics” folder on my laptop:

lyricsfolder.png

and I’ve told GoodReader to sync that folder and its contents. If I add a new song to that folder, it will automatically be mirrored to GoodReader. Tap a song, and off I go:

Lyrics, "Disappear" by Paul Roub

If I’m feeling particularly grown-up and professional, I’ll “star” some of the songs ahead of time, and let GoodReader show me just those songs as something approaching a setlist:

set list in GoodReader

That’s it. No more binder of lyrics for me, and I’m pretty happy about it. I do recommend putting the iPad in airplane mode before your set, to avoid the temptation to tweet mid-song.

Video From the July 11th Songwriter’s Showcase

“Disappear”, “One Man at Best”, “The Great Unknown” and “Mind of Its Own”, live at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts.

“Disappear”

“One Man at Best”

“The Great Unknown”

“Mind of Its Own”

All four songs are from my album “Acrophobe”, available for purchase (CD or download) at music.paulroub.com.

How to Be Surprisingly Popular at Gate C9

(or any gate, really)

Have one of these in your backpack:

Outlets To Go Power Strip with USB

Bonus points: lend it to a Dad whose two Disneyed-out kids both want to watch videos on their run-down iPods. That guy bought me a coffee.

Replacement Charger for Acer 1420P (PDC09) Tablet

I was lucky enough to get one of the Acer 1420P convertible tablet/netbooks at Microsoft PDC 2009. Yesterday, the AC adapter died. Since this isn’t a model that was sold through normal channels, different find-your-adapter sites give varying answers as to what might work.

I picked up a Rocketfish Universal Adapter today, since one of the tips appeared, through the packaging, to be a match. Works like a charm, laptop is fully charged, and I have a bunch of other tips handy when something else dies.

You’ll want the MT32 tip (included), by the way.